April 2, 2013

Roger Vivier. The art shoes out of the fashion history books, and back into the stores

Roger Vivier

Roger Vivier is among the illustrious brands basking in a sumptuous past and having brought a revolutionary style which, after a hiatus following the loss of their founding genius, were heading towards oblivion – except for the true passionate, of course – to be then be brought back into existence by the business instinct for the authentic of two French entrepreneurs. Vionnet, another Sleeping Beauty already successfully been blown the breath of life, joins Roger Vivier – with EUR 74.5 million sales last year – into the realm of the princesses turned Cinderellas to be then salvaged for a happily ever after.

Roger Vivier

Numbers are, yet, frivolous and unworthy of the passion and history of Vivier. Roger Vivier, having studied sculpture and showing an immense love for the craft he had chosen, created, over the decades, shoes-pieces-of-art for Christian Dior, Yves Saint Laurent, Emanuel Ungaro, Balenciaga and Nina Ricci. He mentored the wonderful Christian Louboutin and shooed in wonders turned history Marlene Dietrich, Grace Kelly, Elizabeth Taylor and Catherine Deneuve.

Roger Vivier

He imagined the perfect stiletto – what was the world before its existence? – introduced the unique comma heel, the pilgrim and covered his original shapes and styles in silk, lace, pearls and jewellery.

To wear Vivier shoes is like wearing a dream. And Roger Vivier used to say that “Le smart woman is le same everywhere.”. Roger Vivier is a reborn dream and its fame, since higher it is quite simply impossible, is to be born farther around the world that it has yet been able to reach.

Roger Vivier

The Roger Vivier shoes are available in stores, through the online boutique, or at Colette. The book dedicated to Roger Vivier, by Virginie Mouzat and Colombe Pringle, has today been launched in bookstores and on Amazon.

 

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Photo sources: Roger Vivier, metmuseum.org